Posts Tagged ‘Shocks’

Resilience: Coping with the energy crisis at home (2)

This is the second post in my series looking at our personal resilience, and what plans we need to put in place to make sure that we are in a position to help our local community through any deep potholes on our otherwise Gentle Descent. These posts are not designed to provide long-term solutions, rather they’re looking at short, sharp, shocks to the system: the impacts of extreme weather & flooding, rolling blackouts, fuel shortages and the like.

In making your own plans it’s important to consider each end of the spectrum, from extreme heat to extreme cold, and drought to flooding. Remember, nobody seems to be giving a consistent 10-year weather forecast for the UK in a changing climate, other than to say “weather will be more extreme, more variable”. The lessons from recent incidents in the UK and overseas is that if you really want to minimise your impact on local emergency services, and be in a position to help, then you need to be able to look after yourselves for at least ten days. Here are our initial preparations:

Location, Location, Location

Are there any specific risks in the areas where you live, work, and play? Regular major floods? Hurricanes, threat of Earthquakes etc? If there are – and you can – MOVE. Life is tough enough without having to cope with all that extra worry! If you can’t move, then make sure your preparations also include thing to offset those risks – e.g. buy a boat! I won’t be going into too many of these specific risks as we’re going to make pretty sure we’re moving to an area without them. Check out your flood risk at the Environment Agency Flood Maps, and if flooding is a problem they have some great resources on preparing for floods. As a curiosity you can also look at your risk from rising sea levels.

Come up with a Plan (or several)

All the cool gadgets in the world aren’t going to save you if you panic, and don’t know what to do – so make sure you have some sort of plan, and share it with your friends. There is a pretty thorough discussion of this over at DailyKos – it’s a little alarming and serious, but worth a good look.

Water

More than anything else, clean water is our most vulnerable necessity. A small failure in any number of things can result in a failure of the water supply and treatment systems. How will we cope if the taps suddenly stopped delivering clean water? This is exactly what happened to 350,000 people after the 2007 UK floods, and it took 16 days to get the water back on. You need to make sure that your water supply system is able to cope with extreme cold, and potential contamination from low-level floods. If you need to make sure your water is clean, look at this post on providing clean drinking water post-peak-oil, and I’ll have a post shortly on rainwater storage and collection, to make sure you actually have some water to clean up!

More to follow . . .

That’s enough for today, the preparations I’ll look at in the next posts are: Sewage, Food, Medical Supplies, Communications, Clothing, Light, Heat / Cooling
Cooking, Tools, Fuel, Maps, Entertainment, Knowledge & Skills. Just a few more things to think about!

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Resilience: Coping with the energy crisis at home

Resilience is one of the main themes in the Transition movement, focusing on how to ensure that your community is resilient and will be able to survive in a post-peak-oil world. In this post I’m going to take it to a more personal level though – looking at immediate solutions to ensure that we are still around to help our community achieve that resilience.

This post is therefore a little darker than most – it’s only just skirting the “head for the hills with a shotgun / close the door on the bunker” mentality that prevails over at Life After the Oil Crash. What I want to look at is how resilient our family is to the short-term shocks that many are forecasting we will see on our Gentle Descent. These shocks result in similar effects to the UK Fuel Blockades in September 2000 where after only four days of blockades the country had nearly run out of fuel, including for the emergency services:

“Some NHS trusts cancelled non-essential operations due to staff difficulties in reaching work, ambulances were only able to answer emergency calls in most parts of the UK and the National Blood Service reported difficulties in moving supplies around the country. The government placed the NHS on red alert. Supermarkets began rationing food due to difficulties in getting food deliveries through and there were reports of panic buying. Sainsbury’s warned that they would run out of food within days having seen a 50% increase in their sales over the previous two days; Tesco and Safeway stated that they were rationing some items.”

So the question is – how would we, as a family, cope with the impact of an extended fuel shortage – one that didn’t have a happy ending after six days? Or severe storms & flooding? Would some simple preparations now ensure that we would be able to help, rather be a burden to already-overstretched emergency services? This is a significant challenge I’ll have a look at in a series of posts over the next few weeks.

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