Posts Tagged ‘boilers’

Woodburning Stoves for Heating & Hot Water in Smokeless zones (update)

A quick update to my post yesterday on Woodburning Stoves for Heating & Hot Water in Smokeless zones. I’ve just had it confirmed by Rayburn/Aga that they do no wood-fired boiler models which are suitable for smokeless zones. So that means that I should update my Bin your Aga – buy a Rayburn post to “Bin your Aga and Rayburn – A Dunsley Yorkshire’s the only one for me”, and it means I can kiss my prospects of a Rayburn Solar Thermal System goodbye too. 

Maybe it’s time to move to the country 🙂 or look for alternatives to a wood-fired stove for my back-up water heating.

Woodburning Stoves for Heating & Hot Water in Smokeless zones

dunsley-yorkshireWe’re slowly narrowing the field in our wood-fired heating search. Following up on my previous posts on Woodburning Stoves for Heating & Hot Water and Using a Wood-Burning Stove in a Smoke-Control Area, I’ve found an interesting thing:

The Dunsley Yorkshire is the only stove with a back boiler that can be legally used in a smokeless zone

They cost £1922.30 for the wood-only version or £2218.40 for the multi-fuel.

So, if we’re looking at a wood-fired top-up to our solar hot-water that the sort of outlay we’re looking at.

The other consideration is overheating the house – if we succeed in super-insulating the house then having 4.5kw coming out of the Yorkshire into the room might cook us all! I’ll have to do the calculations, and look at how SIP and PassivHaus houses heat their hot water.

Bin your Aga – buy a Rayburn

 

An Esse, not an Aga

An Esse, not an Aga

George Monbiot in the Guardian is launching a campaign against the Aga. He reasons that they use a ridiculous amount of oil, and generate an obscene level of CO2. I have to say that I’m with him on this. You won’t find much about Agas on GentleDescent because once I’d done the basic research and found that you couldn’t get a multi-fuel version I realised they weren’t going to meet my post-peak-oil needs. The decision was helped by articles like this one in The Times about people ditching their Agas

 

If you’ve heard about peak oil at all then surely putting in an oil-fired Aga is profoundly stupid. It’s OIL-FIRED. So when oil runs short or is out of your price range then what are you left with?  A great useless lump of cast iron, and no heating or cooking options – not very resilient! If you have to buy an Aga then at least get a Gas or Electric version, but realise that you’re doing it as a lifestyle choice, it is not a resilient long-term option.

So what should you get? I’m still working that out! The couple in the Times article went for a wood-fired Esse with a back boiler.  Ive looked at some really beautiful wood fired stoves, and the Rayburn, paired with a Solar Thermal system, but I’ve yet to come to a conclusion.

But what should you do if you do have an oil-fired Aga already? Apparently their re-sale valus is terrible, so I guess if you were feeling optimistic you could convert it to Gas, which may last a little longer, and be a little more environmentally friendly. Twyford do official Aga Gas Conversions. Otherwise? Send it for recycling. And buy a Rayburn (probably).

Resilience: Woodburning Stoves for Heating & Hot Water

Thermal Store from BoilerStoves

Thermal Store from BoilerStoves

A lot of time is spent discussing how we’re going to stay warm after the peak, and increasingly people are installing woodburning stoves and / or solar hot water systems  as a part of their solution for heating and hot water. There is a great discussion on this over at Powerswitch and a whole heap of useful links:

Multi-Fuel Stoves with Backboilers

These can burn wood, coal, and a whole range of other combustibles. They have BackBoilers – literally a boiler attached to the back of the stove – to heat water for radiators / hot water.

Gravity-fed Boiler Systems

You can use a pump to get the hot water from your stove-back boiler to the hot water tank, but if the pump fails then you are at rick of damaging the boiler. A simpler way is to use a gravity fed layout, which work on the basis that hot water rises:

 Solar Systems

For even greater resilience we’d have multiple options for hot water and heating. Pairing a Sola Hot Water system with a woodburning stove makes a lot of sense – Solar works best in the summer when you don’t want the stove heating up the house, and in Winter the heat of the stove is a welcome side-effect.

Hot-Water Cylinders and Thermal Stores

These have changed a lot since I was a kid, when we had a big coppery tank in the Airing Cupboard with a thin, patchy red jacket strapped onto it for insulation! Now there’s a whole range available with cast-over insulation, and – essential for our resilient system – multiple inputs. So you can plumb several heat sources into the one tank: Solar, Gas, Electric, or Solid Fuel. A Thermal Store (or Heat Accumulator) is a good way of making the most of your solar and wood-fired hot water. Think of it as a huge hot water tank that can take all the heat your stove can throw at it while going at its most efficient, fast, burn.

Online Tools and Calculators

There are some great calculators available online to help you work out the heating requirements of your house, and to help you design and layout your system: 

  • Tuscan Foundry Calculator – great for calculating the heating required per room
  • idhee – Calculator for ensuring that you get the correct size boiler
  • Heatweb – great schematic designer and calculator for specifying system components

Flues

Short, or poorly-insulated flues seem to cause many problems for woodfired stoves – causing them to let smoke into the room among others.

  • Flue Systems – supply everything your flue may need, including insulated twin-wall flues, chimney fans and cowls.

Well that’s enough background to get started – I’ll add more when I’ve worked out what we’re going to do!

%d bloggers like this: