Resilience: Coping with the energy crisis at home

Resilience is one of the main themes in the Transition movement, focusing on how to ensure that your community is resilient and will be able to survive in a post-peak-oil world. In this post I’m going to take it to a more personal level though – looking at immediate solutions to ensure that we are still around to help our community achieve that resilience.

This post is therefore a little darker than most – it’s only just skirting the “head for the hills with a shotgun / close the door on the bunker” mentality that prevails over at Life After the Oil Crash. What I want to look at is how resilient our family is to the short-term shocks that many are forecasting we will see on our Gentle Descent. These shocks result in similar effects to the UK Fuel Blockades in September 2000 where after only four days of blockades the country had nearly run out of fuel, including for the emergency services:

“Some NHS trusts cancelled non-essential operations due to staff difficulties in reaching work, ambulances were only able to answer emergency calls in most parts of the UK and the National Blood Service reported difficulties in moving supplies around the country. The government placed the NHS on red alert. Supermarkets began rationing food due to difficulties in getting food deliveries through and there were reports of panic buying. Sainsbury’s warned that they would run out of food within days having seen a 50% increase in their sales over the previous two days; Tesco and Safeway stated that they were rationing some items.”

So the question is – how would we, as a family, cope with the impact of an extended fuel shortage – one that didn’t have a happy ending after six days? Or severe storms & flooding? Would some simple preparations now ensure that we would be able to help, rather be a burden to already-overstretched emergency services? This is a significant challenge I’ll have a look at in a series of posts over the next few weeks.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: